Topic: Brent Stirton

Misha Friedman
PHOTOJOURNALISMLINKS

PJL: July 2014 (Part 1)

Curated by Mikko Takkunen, a collection of the most interesting photojournalism and documentary photography from across the web.

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Robin Hammond—National Geographic
PHOTOJOURNALISMLINKS

PJL: June 2014 (Part 3)

Curated by Mikko Takkunen, a collection of the most interesting photojournalism and documentary photography from across the web.

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Maxim Dondyuk
PHOTOJOURNALISMLINKS

PJL: January 2014 (Part 2)

Curated by Mikko Takkunen, a collection of the best photojournalism around the web from the past two weeks.

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Jerome Delay / AP
PHOTOJOURNALISMLINKS

PJL: December 2013 (Part 2)

Curated by Mikko Takkunen, a collection of the best photojournalism around the web from the past two weeks.

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GOMA, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO, 4 OCTOBER 2008: Orphaned mountain gorilla Ndkasi and her ICCN conservation ranger care-giver Baboo play in the make-shift gorilla orphanage in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo, 4 October 2008. At this time, the make-shift facility was noisy and dusty, the opposite of the natural environment of the mountain gorilla sector of the Park. The care-giver lives and sleeps in the same space with the orphan in 3 weeks shifts, 24/7, with one week off a month to see his family. Ndkasi's mother was killed in order to secure the Gorilla baby by poachers. The poachers had hoped to sell the baby but were caught in a sting by ICCN conservation rangers. Mountain Gorillas are extremely endangered and exist in a small region of the Virunga mountains on the border of DR Congo and Rwanda with a small family in Uganda. Today, the Senkekwe Mountain Gorilla Orphanage has been built inside the headquarters of the ICCN at Rumangabo, about 50 kilometers outside of Goma, that facility houses 5 orphans including the latest orphan Ihirwe. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)
Photo Essay

Saving Congo’s Gorillas: A Refuge for Species Under Threat

The genetic difference between a gorilla and a human being is tiny—we share 98.4% of our DNA. Photographer Brent Stirton photographed the gorillas of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the people who care for them, documenting a bond that is more than just genes.

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