The 10 Best Cameras for Summer

You’d be hard-pressed to find a bad review of Sony’s latest Cyber-shot RX100 III. With its large 20.1-megapixel sensor, a sensitivity range of ISO 100-6400 and its fast 24-70mm lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.8, you just can’t go wrong. Not only does it offer great results in auto mode, but the RX100 III also offers full manual controls, making it an ideal companion for amateur and professional photographers alike. Of course, the closer you get to perfection, the higher the price: $799.
You’d be hard-pressed to find a bad review of Sony’s latest Cyber-shot RX100 III. With its large 20.1-megapixel sensor, a sensitivity range of ISO 100-6400 and its fast 24-70mm lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.8, you just can’t go wrong. Not only does it offer great results in auto mode, but the RX100 III also offers full manual controls, making it an ideal companion for amateur and professional photographers alike. Of course, the closer you get to perfection, the higher the price: $799.
Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III

Don’t believe the marketing hype: the number of pixels, the array of creative filters, and the numerous dedicated buttons – none of that really matters. Today, what you’re looking for is a camera that’s easy to use while offering the best image quality in most situations.

A camera that packs 24 megapixels won’t necessary offer the best results compared to one with just 12 megapixels – especially in low-light conditions. If you’re looking to make sharp photographs at a party without having to carry a bulky Digital SLR, you can’t go wrong with the Canon PowerShot S120 or the Sony RX100 III. But if you’re after a camera that can handle fast action shots – kids running around, for example – the Fujifilm XT-1 is your camera of choice.

Whether you’re after the fastest compact camera or the most stylish one, TIME LightBox offers its selection of the 10 best models in time for the summer season.


Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent.


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