World Press Photo Multimedia Awards Announced

Emin Özmen—Agence Le Journal
Emin Özmen—Agence Le Journal
Witnessing Gezi. 1st Prize Long Feature

Barış Koca's feature is built around the recordings of photojournalist Emin Özmen, who witnessed the protests against a proposed urban development plan at Istanbul’s Taksim Gezi Park. The protests sparked supporting strikes across Turkey, and a nationwide resistance movement.

The winners of the fourth annual World Press Photo Multimedia competition were announced in Amsterdam.

Emin Özmen and Barış Koca’Witnessing Gezi won first prize in the Long Feature category. The winning feature is built around the work of photojournalist Özmen, who documented the protests against a proposed urban development plan at Istanbul’s Taksim Gezi Park. Other prize winners in this category included Brent McDonald and Stephen Maing’s behind the scenes look at the last month of Christine Quinn’s New York mayoral bid for The New York Times, and MediaStorm’s feature — with Director of Photography Rick Gershon  on early onset dementia.

World Press Multimedia Award winners

World Press Multimedia Awards

First Row L to R: Hollow—Requisite Media: 3rd Prize Interactive Documentary
Silent Night: The Kandahar Massacre—Lela Ahmadzai/2470media: 2nd Prize Short Feature
A Short History of the Highrise—National Film Board of Canada/The New York Times: 1st Prize Interactive Documentary
Second Row L to R: Calcio Storico—David Ramos: 3rd Prize Short Feature
Swan Song— MediaStorm: 3rd Prize Long Feature
Hers to Lose—The New York Times: 2nd Prize Long Feature

Marco Casino’s Staff Riding picked up first prize in the Short Feature category. The work looks at the often dangerous practice of train surfing in South Africa. Second prize went to Lela Ahmadzai’s poignant look at the Kandahar massacre, and third prize to David Airob and David Ramos’ work on an early form of soccer.

In the interactive documentary category — namely those documentaries accessible on the web, and actively navigated through by viewers — Katerina Cizek’s A Short History of the High Rise came first. While Ewen MacAskill and Gabriel Dance’s look at The Guardian‘s investigative stories based on leaked top-secret National Security Agency documents came second, and Elaine McMillion Sheldon’s piece on a shrinking West Virginia community came in third place.

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