2014 World Press Photo Awards Announced

World Press Photo of the Year 2013. 26 February 2013, Djibouti City, Djibouti. African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city at night, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighboring Somalia—a tenuous link to relatives abroad. Djibouti is a common stop-off point for migrants in transit from such countries as Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea, seeking a better life in Europe and the Middle East.
John Stanmeyer—VII for National Geographic
World Press Photo of the Year 2013.
26 February 2013, Djibouti City, Djibouti. African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city at night, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighboring Somalia—a tenuous link to relatives abroad. Djibouti is a common stop-off point for migrants in transit from such countries as Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea, seeking a better life in Europe and the Middle East.

Today, the winners of the prestigious 57th annual World Press Photo competition were announced in Amsterdam.

John Stanmeyer from the U.S. received the prize for World Press Photo of the Year 2013. His piece shows African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighboring Somalia. Djibouti is a common stop-off point for migrants in transit to Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea.

TIME photography featured prominently, with Sara Naomi Lewkowicz picking up 1st prize in the Contemporary Issues category for her series on domestic violence in Ohio, William Daniels winning 2nd prize in the General News category for his work on violence and unrest in Central African Republic, and Peter van Agtmael being awarded 2nd prize in the People/Observed Portraits category for his portraits of Iraq veteran Bobby Henline.

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