The Crisis in the Central African Republic by William Daniels

People demonstrate violently in a street in Bangui asking for the president Djotodia to step down, following the murder of a magistrate shot dead the night before along with another man. 30 minutes later the Seleka came and shot towards the demonstrators, killing 2 men and wounded one.
William Daniels—Panos for TIME
The following photographs were taken on assignment for TIME between Nov. 14-21, 2013.

People demonstrate violently in the street in Bangui, demanding that President Djotodia steps down following the murder of a magistrate shot dead the night before. 30 minutes later, the Séléka arrived and fired into the crowd, killing two men and wounded one.

Africa is a continent brimming with stories insufficiently told in the West. But in a year where we’ve followed the French intervention in Mali, the gruesome shopping mall terror attack in Nairobi, the ceaseless conflicts of the Congo and the brutal ravages of Nigeria’s Boko Haram insurgency, one tragic crisis has been almost completely absent from international frontpages: in the Central African Republic, a nation located where it says it is, virtually the entire population of 4.6 million people is “enduring suffering beyond imagination,” according to the U.N.

After an alliance of rebel groups known as Séléka seized power in March from the government of President François Bozizé, the mineral-rich yet dirt-poor state fell into chaos. Rival factions carried out kidnappings, murders, rapes and went about conscripting child soldiers. African peacekeeping troops and government forces proved hapless and helpless. The humanitarian situation grew dire, with political instability compounding existing crises — some 1.5 million people, a third of the country, are now in critical need of food, shelter and basic sanitation.

Moreover, the ongoing violence has taken on a grim — and, for the Central African Republic, unprecedented — sectarian dimension. Many of the Séléka fighters are reportedly Muslim, some of them having joined the fight from neighboring Chad and Sudan. Muslim-Christian clashes in September led to over 100 deaths; Christian self-defense groups known as anti-balaka (or “anti-machete”) militias have sprung up. Communities of both faiths have been uprooted, scattered, forced to flee their homes. The French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius warned last week that the Central African Republic “is on the verge of genocide.”

The U.N. is set to meet soon to discuss dispatching thousands of peacekeepers to the country. France, the former colonial power, is preparing to triple the troop numbers it has stationed in the capital Bangui. Relief agencies are calling for tens of millions of dollars in urgent humanitarian assistance.

With the conflict poised on a knife edge, French photojournalist William Daniels traveled on assignment to the Central African Republic. He passed through funerals, refugee camps and bands of men with guns. In many of his photos, there is a sense of shock and grief—the mute horror of a nation tearing at its own seams. It’s hard to watch, but it would be more shameful to look away.


William Daniels is a photographer represented by Panos Pictures. Daniels previously wrote for TIME about his escape from Syria.

Ishaan Tharoor is a Senior Editor at TIME and Editor of TIME World. Follow him on Twitter @ishaantharoor.


Related Topics: , , , ,

Latest Posts

President Barack Obama Meets with Dallas Nurse Nina Pham

Pictures of the Week: Oct. 17 – Oct. 24

From the sentencing of Oscar Pistorius and a fatal shooting at the Canadian War Memorial, to a pair of white lion cubs in Serbia and Darth Vader on the campaign trail, TIME presents the best pictures of the week

Read More
Namsa Leuba

A Fresh Look at Africa through Nigeria’s Largest Photo Festival

A North Korean woman walks on the peak of Mt. Paektu in North Korea's Ryanggang province, June 18, 2014 .

Photojournalism Daily: Oct. 24, 2013

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 17,711 other followers