Rare Contact Prints from Man Ray’s Archive

© The Man Ray Trust / ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London
© The Man Ray Trust / ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London
Study for Cover: Photographs by Man Ray, 1920-1934, 1933

A rare collection of darkroom contact prints from Man Ray’s archive will be on display — for the first time ever — in an exhibition slated to run from February 21st through March 28th at Atlas Gallery in London.

Once belonging to Man Ray’s darkroom printer, Pierre Gassman, these prints reveal a subtlety that is often lost or overlooked in the prolific Surrealist’s work. Seen in their earliest, un-manipulated form, these still lifes and early examples of Man Ray’s portraiture evince a casual sensibility — a willingness to engage in trial and error — that feels, somehow, refreshingly at odds with the American-born modernist’s more widely known, finished works.

A central figure in both the Dada and Surrealist movements, Man Ray (born Emmanuel Radnitzky in 1890 in Philadelphia) created portraits of his contemporaries — often hugely influential cultural figures — including James Joyce, Picasso, Ava Gardner and Coco Chanel. Some of those portraits will be on display, publicly, for the first time at the Atlas show.


Man Ray: Contacts is on display at Atlas Gallery in London through March 28th. 


Related Topics: , , , , ,

Latest Posts

Lorena Ros

Powerful Photos of Child Sex Abuse Survivors

Photographer Lorena Ros survived sexual abuse, now her newest project highlights the strength and dignity of other survivors.

Read More
David smoking a cigarette outside his house.

Life Inside a Community of Sex Offenders

Some 200 towers, like these in Ushguli—built mainly from the 9th into the 13th centuries for shelter during wars, raids, and blood feuds—remain in Svaneti. Now they’re used to store hay and grain for farm animals, including pigs.

Photojournalism Links Daily Digest: Sept. 16, 2014

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 16,308 other followers