366: The Year in Photographs 2012

Dan Kitwood—Getty Images
Dan Kitwood—Getty Images
Jan. 1, 2012. Fireworks light up the London skyline and Big Ben just after midnight in London. Thousands of people lined the banks of the River Thames to ring in the New Year with a spectacular fireworks display.

The year 2012 was a cyclone of news. The civil war in Syria grew bloodier and more desperate even as the rest of the Middle East was grappling with life after the so-called Arab Spring. Egypt’s democratic evolution at times seemed to verge on revolution again. Libya produced a bloody controversy for the U.S. on an inauspicious date, Sept. 11, with the death of the American ambassador amid an attack on a diplomatic compound in Benghazi. And as the U.S. itself marched toward the scheduled climax of a presidential election, what should slam into the country but superstorm Sandy, wrecking much of the northeast coast. The election itself, while it had many people holding their breath, produced another term for Barack Obama and the country promptly started to worry about falling off the fiscal cliff. And then another unexpected event occurred: the madness of mass murder in a quiet town in Connecticut. The death of children and teachers left the country breathless and in tears. The only news fizzle of the year was the predicted end of the world. No one needs to be concerned about that, just about dealing with what ails it as it goes on and on and on.

Howard Chua-Eoan, News Director, TIME

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CARNIVORE’S DILEMMA PERMITTED USE: This image may be downloaded or is otherwise provided at no charge for one-time use for coverage or promotion of National Geographic magazine dated November 2014 and exclusively in conjunction thereof. No copying, distribution or archiving permitted. Sublicensing, sale or resale is prohibited. REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption, which makes reference to NGM. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing NGM are subject to paid licensing. Mandatory usage requirements:1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image © Brian Finke/National Geographic2. Show the November cover of National Geographic somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic) unless using only one image - you do not have to show the cover3. Provide a prominent link to: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/meat/4. Mention that the images are from "the November issue of National Geographic magazine”Beef is big in Texas. Last year in the state, ten times as many calves were born, 3.85 million, as human babies.At the Big Texan in Amarillo—which offers free rides in a longhorn limo—you get your 72-ounce steak for free ifyou finish it in under an hour, along with the shrimp cocktail, the baked potato, the salad, and the roll.

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