New York, Cocteau and a Parabolic Mirror: ‘Berenice Abbott: Photographs’

Berenice Abbott / Courtesy of Editions Hazan and Yale University Press
Berenice Abbott / Courtesy of Editions Hazan and Yale University Press
Nightview, New York City, 1932

Though she went to Paris in 1921 to study sculpture, Berenice Abbott would transition to photography when she became Man Ray’s assistant in 1923. Three years later, she set up her own studio, photographing the French capital’s bohemians, artists and intellectuals—and famous friends such as writers James Joyce and Jean Cocteau—before moving back to the States in 1929.

For the next two decades, Abbott focused her lens on Depression-Era New York, producing a number of moving, black-and-white images that would become part of her book Changing New York. This series, along with nearly 120 other images, is being featured in a new exhibition at Toronto’s Ryerson Image Center called Berenice Abbott: Photographs.

“She was an underestimated photographer during her life and even today,” says Gaelle Morel, the exhibition’s curator and author of the accompanying book, Berenice Abbott. “But Berenice has this capacity of mixing different aesthetics, depending on the subject, which was really extraordinary. She can do a more modern, New Vision style when it came to photographing New York buildings, or take a more documentary approach for her portraits.”

Keystone-France / Getty Images

Berenice Abbot standing for a portrait, behind a view-camera, circa early 1900s

Abbott gained acclaim for her own comprehensive career, which would later involve photographic work on physics, commissioned by Boston’s Massachusetts Institute of Technology. But she also became famous for her staunch support of French photographer Eugène Atget, whom she met in 1925 while living in Paris. Atget died two years later, and it was Abbott who would photo-edit a book of his work and help stage an exhibition of his work in New York. She sold her Atget collection to the Museum of Modern Art in 1968.

“Berenice always said she had two careers—one of her own, and one championing Atget,” Morel says. “She wanted to be recognized as the Atget of New York, not necessarily his aesthetic, but his intellect.”

Berenice Abbott: Photographs, co-organized by The Ryerson Image Centre in Toronto and the Jeu de Paume in Paris, is on view through Aug. 19 at Toronto’s Art Gallery of Ontario. The accompanying book is published by Editions Hazan and Yale University Press.

Related Topics: , , , , , , , , ,

Latest Posts

The Sponge Bob Squarepants float makes its way down 6th Ave during the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York

The Best Pictures of the Week: Nov. 21 – Nov. 28

From violent protests over the Ferguson shooting verdict and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s sudden resignation to the dismantling of India’s first aircraft carrier and Lionel Messi’s new goals record, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

Read More
grid

TIME Picks the Best Photobooks of 2014

Al Khumaini Msallam Qudiah is seen exiting his rubbled home in Khan Younis, southern Gaza, on Nov. 1st 2014.Al Khumaini and his sons live in the rubbled home, while his wife and daughters live with their relatives. His farmland was bulldozed by Israeli army. He began building new farm, with the bricks and material from his rubbled home.

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 28, 2014

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 19,456 other followers