2012 TIME 100 Includes Artist Christian Marclay

© Christian Marclay / Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York; Installation Photo: Werner Graf
© Christian Marclay / Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York; Installation Photo: Werner Graf
Footsteps, Shedhalle, Zurich, June 4 – July 16, 1989

In 1989, Marclay created the installation Footsteps where visitors were invited to view and step on exposed vinyls containing recordings of footsteps. Following the six-week exhibition, the vinyls, damaged by the all of the foot-traffic, were removed and became recordings of new scratchy rhythms, which were then packaged with a poster of the show and sold as individual pieces.

Our annual TIME 100 magazine issue takes stock of the 100 most influential people of the year, and this year that list included Christian Marclay, the artist behind the highly-regarded video piece The Clock. That piece is only one highlight from the artist’s varied career— which extends itself in across an array of mediums, from sound and performance, to photography and sculpture—some of his other work is featured in the gallery above.

Geoff Dyer—whose many books include The Ongoing Moment, a series of essays about photography—wrote about Marclay for TIME:

© Christian Marclay / Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York and White Cube, London; Installation Photo: Todd-White Art Photography

Installation view of The Clock at White Cube Mason's Yard, London (Oct. 15 – Nov. 13, 2010)

Wherever it has been shown, Christian Marclay’s The Clock has been met with a rare combination of critical approval and public affection—love, even. The idea was audacious in its simplicity and herculean in execution: take moments in films when people are interacting with time—looking at their watches, hurrying to intercept the 3:10 to Yuma or hanging on to the hands of Big Ben—and splice them together in such a way that they unfold in real time over 24 hours, so that the whole thing becomes an accurate (to the minute) timepiece. During the film’s opening run in London, I had intended to stay long enough to get the gag—10 minutes?—before hurrying on to a lunch date. It was so hypnotic, so thrilling, that I ended up watching 20 hours over a month, arranging life and appointments (for which I was invariably late) in such a way as to catch previously unseen segments of that celluloid epic called a day.

Read more about this year’s most influential people in the TIME 100.

Related Topics: , , , ,

Latest Posts

Hyperlapse

How Instagram Hopes Hyperlapse Will Offer ‘Another Way of Seeing’

Hyperlapse, Instagram's newest iOS app, makes it easier to create time-lapse videos. But will it lead to the new creative forms it hopes to inspire?

Read More
On the last day of this year, I looked out my window to find dark clouds full of fear. Then a row of winged beauties circled the sky .. high. As I watched them fly, I silently bid the yearÕs memories goodbye and made room for new ones to come by - Cairo, Egypt 12/31/2013 / Photo & Text by @laura_eltantawy

How Smartphones Have Changed the Way We Experience Photography

Michal Solarski

Nostalgic Photographs of Vacations Past

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 15,659 other followers