Behind the Cover: The Future of Oil

Kenji Aoki for TIME
Kenji Aoki for TIME
Kenji Aoki photographed oil for this week's TIME magazine. In this gallery, he reveals the process of making the images.

To prepare for this picture, representing the power of oil, crude oil was poured into a balloon. The balloon was pierced, and at the moment of the explosion, created the splash.

Environmentalists like to say that we’re addicted to oil, but that term doesn’t go far enough. An addict can survive without drugs or alcohol, even if the withdrawal would be painful. But modern society as we know it would end tomorrow without oil. Oil literally makes our world go, from the lawnmower to the supersonic jet. If coal becomes too expensive, we can generate electricity with natural gas or nuclear or renewables. If beef is too costly, we can eat chicken. But there is no real replacement for oil, which is why we depend upon it so much—and why we hate ourselves for that dependence.

Kenji Aoki for TIME

Before

Kenji Aoki for TIME

...and after.

Photographer Kenji Aoki captured the power of oil in a series of photographs shot for this week’s TIME cover. For one photograph, Aoki poured unrefined Texas crude into a balloon, shooting the moment it exploded. In another, Aoki poured the oil along the inside wall of a clear bowl, and shot it as the oil glided down to collect at the bottom. Aoki captures the essence of oil, a substance that all of us need yet few of us see in its pure form, fresh from the ground.

Read More: The Truth About Oil

Related Topics: , , , ,

Latest Posts

Martin Schoeller

The Photo That Made Me: Martin Schoeller, New York 1998

Martin Schoeller's portrait of Vanessa Redgrave, shot in 1988, established the photographer's iconic style and jump-started his career

Read More
Congolese attend a Sunday church service in the village of Kitshanga, in Masisi territory on March 9, 2014.

Photojournalism Daily: Oct. 1, 2014

A view over the village of Ngomashi, four hours trek over mountains and through thick bush from the end of the nearest road, Aug 14, 2014.

See the Real Impact of War in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 16,809 other followers