Silhouettes in the News

Altaf Qadri—AP
Altaf Qadri—AP
January 4, 2012. Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama is silhouetted as he teaches an assembly of monks and devotees during the Kalachakra Buddhist festival in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India. Bodh Gaya is believed to be the place where Buddha attained enlightenment.

Prior to the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, the silhouette was considered an effective and inexpensive way to record a person’s likeness or capture a scene. Although the practice can be traced back to the early 17th century, the term ‘silhouette’ derives from the harsh policies of the French finance minister Étienne de Silhouette.

The silhouette reduces an object to its most basic form. Its historical uses in art can be seen in the paper cuts of Hans Christian Andersen and the artwork of Kara Walker. In photographic terms, the silhouette is created in situations where the subject is backlit. It can be used to hide a person’s identity or play up their distinctive features, and its graphic form is often used artistically to photograph sport and dance. It heightens drama, adds atmosphere and makes a banal scene into a graphic wonder.

More than 200 years ago, the silhouette was the foremost way to document one’s appearance, but it’s still widely used in photographic frames today. From capturing the Costa Concordia to presidential primaries and pilgrims, LightBox looks at the use of silhouettes on the wires this month.

Related Topics: , , , , , , , , , ,

Latest Posts

Paul Strand Archive—Aperture Foundation

Paul Strand, Master of Modernism, in Retrospect

The first major retrospective of Paul Strand's work in nearly 50 years presents him as not only a critical figure in the history of modern art, but seeks to re-affirm his place as one of the founders of photography as we know it today.

Read More
Steven Nelson, 51, sits where a window was broken at Red's Original BBQ where he works in Ferguson, Missouri on October 8, 2014.

Photojournalism Daily: Oct. 30, 2014

David Armstrong - Fashion

Remembering Photographer David Armstrong (1954—2014)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 17,868 other followers